How to use the data visualisation and search tools

Search the data

This visualisation provides various insights from across the data. Search for a specific word or term by typing text into the top field, or search the ontology by typing in the name of an entity or relationship in the bottom field. The search will return both a set of quotes related to your word or term and statistical information on the number of responses across the data that are relevant to the query. For example, to examine how documentary genre films are perceived by young people, a text search for ‘documentary’ returns 2462 results.

To refine the results, use the bar and pie charts in the right-hand side panel. This will limit the responses shown to only those that meet the chosen criteria. Refining the example above to show only people in the 18-24 age group reduces the results to 349.

Below the search bars a series of qualitative quotes (with pseudonyms and demographic detail) that match the search criteria and refinement panel criteria are shown, providing meaningful insights. Following the search example above, a quote from Penelope explains that “…they can challenge the way I think about things like about documentary films as well…”. That is, watching documentary films helps her to reflect on her own way of seeing the world. The pseudonym below each quote can be clicked on to access the full transcript, and to see the quote in its full context.

Explore the ontology

This visualisation provides an unstructured way of exploring the project ontology. All data in the project are brought together through a unifying set of entities, entity characteristics, and relationships between them. These are presented as ‘concepts’ in the visualisation, and are ordered into a hierarchy based on the analyses of research data.

The ontology can be explored by clicking on any box and examining the results that it returns. Doing so will provide: (i) a list of concepts that sit beneath the current selected one in the ontology, e.g. sub-topics of that concept (coloured); (ii) a list of the relationships between the selected concept and any others (coloured yellow); and (iii) all research data related to the selected concept.

The number in each box shows how many times that concept occurs across the project, and the text beneath the box provides brief description and category. For example, clicking on Viewing practices shows that the concept is descriptive, and that it has various concepts below it, such as ‘Theatre practices’ (with 12 items) and Shared Viewing practices’ (with 788 items).

Where a concept sits within the ontology can be assess by looking at the breadcrumbs trail above the concept title. Shared viewing practices, for example, shows as being located at Ontology > Viewing practices > Shared viewing practices. Alternatively, the icon to the right hand side of the concept title can be clicked on to access a force graph diagram, showing the relationship amongst others visually.

Where do we watch films?

This visualisation shows where our survey respondents watched films in 2017-18. It also displays interview quotes about the topic.

The panel on the right hand-side displays a demographic breakdown of the currently displayed respondents. Initially, this is a breakdown of the entire data set. Clicking on any chart key, for example ’18-24′, will filter the respondents by that criteria. For example, clicking ‘Female’ will change all the charts to count only female respondents. It will also change all the interview quotes to be from female respondents only. From here, you can click on another chart key to further filter respondents. It is also possible to click on criteria outside of the panel to add other filters.

Who do we watch films with?

This visualisation shows who the survey wave one respondents watched films with in the year 2017-18. It also displays interview quotes about the topic.

The panel on the right displays a demographic breakdown of the currently displayed respondents. Initially, this is a breakdown of the entire data set. Clicking on any chart key, for example ’18-24′, will filter the respondents by that criteria. For example, clicking ‘Female’ will change all the charts to count only female respondents. It will also change all the interview quotes to be from female respondents only. From here, you can click on another chart key to further filter respondents. It is also possible to click on criteria outside of the panel to add other filters.

Mapping independent film exhibition

This data visualisation can be used to explore the real and perceived geographies of film exhibition provision alongside the distributor of funding for specialised film in the UK.

Within the map frame, the plus and minus signs (at the top-left of the frame) allow the map to be zoomed in or out, providing either more granular detail or information at a larger scale. The stacks icon (at the top-right of the frame) allows different layers to be added or taken away from the map in order to compare different datasets. 

The map draws on information from the Independent Cinema Office (ICO) and the Beyond the Multiplex wave one survey data locations centred on outoces (the first half of a UK postcode) for each survey respondent and full postcode for each listed venue/organisation.

The map can be refined by limiting the returned results of wave one survey data to respondents who answered the question “How good is the level of film provision in your local area?” in a particular way.   

At the bottom of the page there are a set of bar charts. These are generated by the details shown on the map and provide further breakdowns, drawing on key aspects of the survey.   

Map Key:

On the map, the colour scheme is as follows:

  • Blue dots indicate particular venues or cinemas (based on a full postcode on the ICO cinema list)
  • PINKORANGE/YELLOW/GREEN/BLUE/PURPLE

Map layers:

The map layers that can be added/removed via the stacks icon are as follows:

  • OpenStreetMap
    This provides a base reference map with underlying geographical data, e.g place names and topography.
  • Funding awards
    Independent Cinema Office (ICO) data on the venues/organisations that had received funding NEEDS INFO ON TIMESCALE AND BETWEEN VALUE OF AWARDS
  • Perceived poor cinema provision
    Survey wave one data on the level of film exhibition provision people feel they have in their local area. Each colour indicates a particular perceived level of provision: COLOUR is ‘Very good’, COLOUR is ‘Good’, COLOUR is ‘Average’, COLOUR is ‘Poor’, COLOUR is ‘Very poor’. 
  • Importance of public transport
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on having access to public transport when choosing to go to the cinema. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of range of films available 
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on local venues showing a broad range of films when choosing to go to the cinema. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of range of cinemas available
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on having a range of different venues available locally when choosing to go to the cinema. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of screening times
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on the screening times of films at local venues when choosing to go to the cinema. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of  ticket cost
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on the cost of a cinema ticket when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of  food and drink cost 
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on the cost of food and drinks at a venue when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of travel time
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on time taken to travel to/from a venue when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of limited free time 
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on having free-time available when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of having people to go with 
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on having people to go with when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • Importance of  childcare commitments
    Survey wave one data on the importance people place on childcare commitments when choosing whether to go there or not. Each colour indicates a particular level of importance: COLOUR is ‘Very important, COLOUR is ‘Important’, COLOUR is ‘Somewhat important’, COLOUR is ‘A little bit important’, COLOUR is ‘Not  important’. 
  • ICO cinema list
    A list of all the cinemas within the Independent Cinema Office ICO) listings, based on DATASET.

Response Analysis

This heat map is generated by the data selected in the two drop down menus. Data from across the research project can be selected to populate the vertical columns and horizontal rows, allowing any two aspects to be combined.

For example, how genres relate to age groups. Each cell can be hovered over to reveal the number of survey responses at that specific intersection between the or and column categories, e.g. how many of the survey respondents had watched a particular film genre within a specific age range. 

To the right-hand side there are a set of names in the panel. These can be clicked on to reveal interview transcripts that are relevant to the data selected in the two drop-down menus.

Heat map key/legend:
The colour of each cell in the heat map relates to specific sets of values. These are dynamic and change with the particular data used to populate the drop-down menus. At present they are:
NEEDS A TABLE WITH COLOURS (THAT MARCH THE HEAT MAP ON-SCREEN ) AND AN EXPLANATION OF WHAT GENERATES THEM (THE CRITERIA) E.G. RED = LESS THAN 10 RESPONSES, ORANGE = 10-14 AND SO ON.

Advanced Response analysis

These heat maps are generated by the data selected in the three drop down menus. Data from across the research project can be selected to populate the vertical columns and horizontal rows, allowing any three aspects to be combined.

For example, how genres relate to age groups. Each cell can be hovered over to reveal the number of survey responses at that specific intersection between the or and column categories, e.g. how many of the survey respondents had watched a particular film genre within a specific age range. 

To the right-hand side there are a set of names in the panel. These can be clicked on to reveal interview transcripts that are relevant to the data selected in the two drop-down menus.

Heat map key/legend 
The colour of each cell in the heat map relates to specific sets of values. These are dynamic and change with the particular data used to populate the drop-down menus. At present they are:

NEEDS A TABLE WITH COLOURS (THAT MARCH THE HEAT MAP ON-SCREEN ) AND AN EXPLANATION OF WHAT GENERATES THEM (THE CRITERIA) E.G. RED = LESS THAN 10 RESPONSES, ORANGE = 10-14 AND SO ON.